The Ultimate Guide to Work-Life Balance – Part Two

Work/Life Balance – What the Hell Is That?

When I worked in college housing, I found myself in a position that made me so uncomfortable, I had some big choices to make.  I could continue to do things they way my supervisor wanted me to, or I could look for another job in favor of more balance in work and in life. I chose the latter.  This was a big choice for me.  I was basically giving up a (rather) stable job that made me unhappy for the unknown.  Keep the job or focus on work/life balance.

You know what?  Focusing on work/life balance was the right thing to do.

It was also the impetus that led me to FINALLY finish my book, “Making ‘Work’ Work for You.”  I absolutely needed to take my work/life balance into consideration and make some drastic changes.  I’ve done that.  And I’ve found that this message is resonating out there in the world of higher education and many other fields.I wanted to share some of the tips and hacks that I’ve developed and learned over the years.  These are strategies I’ve used to make the work day more palatable and my improve my attitude about balance.  The post is long so I’m dividing it up into two parts – and this is part two.  I hope you enjoy the recommendations – and please email me if you have more to add.

How To Put Your Work Day Into Perspective

You know what? It’s just work. It’s meaningful for you – you put your heart and soul into it. But it’s just work. If you can’t draw the line between where your job ends and you begin….that might be a problem. The big thing for me was being able to realize that I was no longer going home angry. That was a beautiful thing. I took my work home – in an emotional manner – for such a long time. I would be so frustrated with the tough day and/or negative students and/or a rotten staff meeting…I’d internalized so much of it and it made me angry. So I needed to draw that line and say, “I’m going home and I’m going to be me.” That’s it.
You may need a buffer from your work day into your home life. If you are a live-in professional, this can be difficult. I’m lucky to have figured this out for me in my current vocation. For two years I was a walking commuter and listened to podcasts on my walk to and from work. Currently, I commute by car but the travel time is about the same. I still listen to podcasts but have been on a mad audiobook phase for the past three months. Jen Sincero just rocks. This usually clears my mind from any daily funk and puts me in a lighter mood when I get home.
Some of you may have very long commutes and so time in traffic further complicates your transition time. Loud music may turn into road rage, so I recommend podcasts (again – I’m a big fan), audiobooks, comfortable/slow music. Even something that you are familiar with and can sing along. But any drive home can feature these things, and you really only need a few minutes to make it happen.
During that transition time (otherwise known as your commute home), let go of everything that happened at work that day. The work day is over. What are you looking forward to once you get there? Spouse or significant other? Family, kids? Dogs? Someone making an amazing dinner for you? A very nice glass of wine and a fire? Focus on one of those things to think about while you let your work day go…and SMILE. Even if you have to force yourself to smile. Because even just smiling will brighten your mood.

Learning how to “unplug” and separate

Even as I’m writing this, I know good and well that I struggle with this myself. My husband and I have smart phones and tablets, and I often bring my work laptop home. So I myself am not the model of unplugging. Writing for The Bulletin, Sarah Comstock addresses the fact that technology has been a double-edged sword. Advances are helpful and convenient but “have placed an enormous burden of relentless pressure on people as expectations rise in parallel with the speed of technological progress.” Computers and gadgets are suddenly able to do just about anything; as human beings, we need to recognize that we can’t do everything. Being able to get away from our devices and technology is paramount to finding work/life balance.
In the first place, the main reason we add our work email to our phones is for convenience and flexibility. Having that connection allows us to respond to certain requests maybe between meetings, or while otherwise occupied. It’s most certainly not meant to keep us from our families or friends or to occupy our down time. You pull out the laptop with the intention of doing some personal research or maybe you are checking your bank account, and the next thing you know you’re opening Outlook and responding to emails. Suddenly a 15 minute task turns into an hour, or two. Next, there’s the itching desire to “quickly check email” while you are at a restaurant with your significant other or friends and there you go again – you get caught up in an email chain of crap that clearly could wait until the next day.
Does any of this sound like you? It’s me, too, much of the time. Some different strategies to consider include:
a. Do a “detox” from some of the apps on your phone that suck up your time. These apps could include social media, games, fitness, or sports viewing. Based on a challenge I learned about on the Rich Roll podcast, for the entire month of June 2015, I took all social media off my phone. I did not check in anywhere, I did not tweet or post on Facebook, there were no new Instagram shots in my feed. That gave me some balance when spending time with family and friends – it was nice to just be with them and not otherwise occupied with distractions.
b. Consider whether your employer requires you to have a department-issued cell phone; and if your institutional culture dictates that you have access to your email all the time. One of my previous institutions did require a department-issued phone with work email intact. I received compensation for this, but it was expected that email notifications be turned on and the focus be on staying up to date with all communication.
Thankfully, that is not the current culture for me. I do have work email on my phone, but notifications are turned off; and, in fact, from time to time I think about removing work email from my phone because I’d just as soon not have to worry about it. But given that my boss has work email on her phone, I model that example. And our classified staff members are not required to have email on their phone.
If the culture of your institution or your department requires this – don’t be a rogue employee for the sake of balance. But consider other ways that you can insure that your work email doesn’t dominate your device. Are you able to turn off the work-related phone on the weekends? At night? Talk to your supervisor about expected response times? No one can check email 24 hours a day and still expect to be bright-eyed and bushy-tailed at the office.  That is NOT work/life balance.
Try to keep your email at the office from dominating your day. I’m doing the best I can to open, read, and respond/delete to my emails as soon as I get into Outlook, and then close the application until the end of the day. I try to be at “Inbox Zero” before I go home. This insures that I’m not wrongly multitasking during the work day (which, by the way, there is no such thing as multitasking) or spending too much unnecessary time on email when there are projects to complete.
A new strategy I’m employing is to not open my email until I return from my lunch break. This was something my current supervisor read about in an article, and I really love the reasoning behind it. When you start the day with email, you are letting others dictate your priorities rather than controlling these yourself. If the email truly is an emergency, that person will call you or come find you. Hit up your main priorities in the morning, and then settle into the questions after you get some food. I’m enjoying the productivity of my morning and the peace of mind I feel because I’m not letting others dictate my work day.
Essential to unplugging and finding balance is the notion of separating. Don’t multitask your work and your life. Unless part of your job is posting to social media daily, leave all that stuff at home during the work day. Do you need Facebook and Twitter open on your computer while you try to write that report (or get your email to “Inbox Zero”)? In his book, Deep Work, Cal Newport suggests “the overuse of social media unwittingly cripples our ability to success in the world of knowledge work.” Social media is lots of fun, but in the office it’s just a diversion that’s keeping you from finishing your vital tasks. The sooner you get your stuff done, the sooner you get home.
If you must make a personal call, check in with your significant other, or connect with your family; you can do so by taking a quick break and making your call from the breakroom or outside.
So – that’s my Ultimate Guide.  I hope to hear from many of you with your thoughts and other suggestions for how to get work/life balance into your world.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *